THROWBACK THURSDAY: 3 Phase Featuring Dr. Motte ‎– Der Klang Der Familie [1992]

The sixth record to be published on the then-fledgling Tresor label, and then subsequently released on Space Teddy, Transmat, Novamute and countless other imprints, 3 Phase Featuring Dr. Motte’s Der Klang Der Familie IS the sound of European techno in the early 90s, long before genres even had been identified…

3 Phase, aka Sven Röhrig, had been producing records since the 1980s, such as Taste The Lash (with his band Boom Factory), but in teaming up with Love Parade founder Dr Motte on this track, the title of which translates as The Sound Of The Family, he struck techno gold.

From the caterwauling synth intro to the sinister arpeggiated stabs, its a little piece of (nocturnal) Berlin that never grows old.

Also worth checking out is the book Der Klang Der Familie, by Felix Denk and Sven von Thülen, which chronicles how the fall of the Wall gave birth to the city’s techno scene.

[Thanks to 3phaseBerlin for the upload]

The day AFTER the Love Parade [July 1996]…

Berlin’s Love Parade may have made its last passage through the Tiergarten some years ago, but as this video illustrates, the city’s ravers have long proven themselves to be masters of the after party…

This video, of revellers partying outside the former Tresor complex on Leipziger Straße, captures Berlin at a perhaps more innocent time (the cranes in the distance hint at the city’s affluent future), laying the foundations for the all-day-all-night ravers paradise it has become. The site featured is actually the grounds of the current Federal Council buildings (Das Ge­bäu­de des Bun­des­ra­tes).

With practically everyone’s face blurred, it’s up to the music and energy to shine through. Keep an eye out for the arrival (and swift departure – yay!) of the ‘Polizei’ at around the 18 minute mark, just before DHS – ‘House of God kicks in…

[Thanks to SignalRot for the upload]

12,000 ravers descend on Bournemouth [May 1992]…

Bournemouth maybe better known for its seaside (and occasional good weather) but back in May 1992, the town was on the map for a different reason, as 12,000 ravers descended on Matchams Stadium for an all night Fantazia party…

Earlier this month, the Bournemouth Daily Echo reeled in the years when it posted a total of 93 photos from the event – expect white gloves, neon paint and plenty of Vicks Vaporub. DJs spinning on the night included Slipmatt, Sasha, Colin Dale and Phantasy. [Photos by John Beasly].

Pictures can be found here: http://bit.ly/2wemRiC

For those of you that prefer your images with added beats, this footage from the gig should bring back a few memories [kudos to thunderpants for the upload]…

Dave Clarke, a breed apart… [August 1995]

Now considered a member of techno’s premier league, Dave Clarke first became a household name with his Directional Force work on R&S in the early 90s, as well as the now legendary Red trilogy on Bush Records…

This interview with Ben Turner of MUZIK magazine from August 1995, finds the then 26-year-old Clarke in chipper form, musing on the travails of a globetrotting DJ, the Tory government, his love of fast cars and his reputation for telling it like it is…

“I’m sorry, but I don’t feel proud of being part of this world. I see the human race as the biggest plague the world has ever seen. Humans are supposed to be so f**king intelligent, and yet the majority of us can’t see what’s going on around us. There’s a lot more to it than ‘When’s Red 3 coming out?’ and f**king sequencers…”

The standout, though, is when Clarke is asked to rate his fellow DJs and producers – certainly pulling no punches when it comes to Richie Hawtin’s Plastikman work…

Article by Ben Turner, photos by Vincent McDonald. Sourced from http://www.muzikmagazine.co.uk/

David Morales’ house music essentials [July 1993]…

While David Morales cut his teeth in the 1980s, both as an accomplished remixer and a protege to Larry Levan at the Paradise Garage, in 1993 the Brooklyn-born DJ would find international acclaim with Gimme Luv, published on Mercury Records…

Within ten years (helped no end by the Chi-Lites sampling Needin U in 1998), he would be one of the world’s highest paid ‘superstar DJs’.

In this interview from The Face in 1993, Morales outlines the changing nature of the New York club scene at the time, as well as the importance of long DJ sets…

“Playing records should be like having sex – you take your time..”

Sasha details how to ‘read’ a crowd…

In this interview with Skiddle, from 2015, Sasha turns back the clock to recall warehouse raves in Blackpool and Blackburn, his alliance with longtime cohort John Digweed, and his Shelley’s Laserdome residency in Stoke, which would lay the foundations for his now three decade career…

The artist formerly known as Alexander Coe also defines the art of ‘reading the crowd’, which in an era of push-button, USB drive, DJing by numbers, is a fast becoming a lost art.

“There’s a time for slamming mixes in, making it obvious that you’re going to drop the next record and there’s a time to wind people in to a hypnotic groove, where the transitions are very slick.

“If you’re playing at a festival you want people to know your next record is coming in and it’s going to make a bang, because it’s about that anticipation, the build up and the release. When you’re playing at a festival people don’t want to hear smooth transitions. They don’t want to hear something very slick and subtle, they want to hear what you’re doing.

“Whereas if you’re at Fabric at seven o’clock in the morning and you’re trying out new music, messing around with new sounds, you want to be able to get lost in that hypnotic thing and you want it to be as slick as possible.”

Sets such as this one, from Shelley’s in 1991, helped shape Sasha’s style – while often labelled as a ‘progressive house’ DJ, followers of his career will know that he works from a far broader canvas. [Kudos to Sarah Davies for the upload]

 

 

The KLF are back… and not a moment too soon…

What is it about two-decade hiatuses in the music industry? In the past few years, we’ve seen the return of drone rockers My Bloody Valentine, with their first new album since 1991, and The Stone Roses, who reformed 17 years after their disastrous blowout at the Reading Festival…

Now it’s the turn of techno pranksters The KLF, who returned at 00.23am this morning (23 August), exactly 23 years after their much-heralded publicity stunt – the burning of £1 million on the island of Jura, Scotland, in 1994. Rather than release a new album, however, the self-styled Justified Ancients of Mu Mu have this time published a book: 2023: A Trilogy [buy it on Amazon here]

As this article from today’s The Guardian explains, the book envisages a world in which the world is ruled by a Big Five multinational tech corporations, GoogleByte, Wikitube, Amazaba, FaceLife and AppleTree, reality TV impresario Simon Cowell has been murdered, and general degradation persists all round.

An extract from the book reads thus:

“There are some who have decreed order is the natural order of not only the human condition but of everything that has ever existed and is ever likely to exist.

And there are those who have proclaimed chaos is the natural order not only of the human condition but of everything that has ever existed and is ever likely to exist.

And there are those who have made it their lives’ work to exploit our natural hunger for order.

And there are those who have made it their lives’ work to exploit our natural hunger for chaos.

It is a free market for all of you living in the free world.”

Stirring stuff. But what about the burning of the million quid (which is now worth £1.87 million, adjusted for inflation)? What’s the deal with the year 2023? And more importantly, what happened to the music?

Something tells me we haven’t heard the last of Messrs. Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty. In the meantime, check out this classic  video of What Time Is Love, from 1991…

[Main image taken from The KLF’s Facebook page]

DJ Stingray: Detroit’s master craftsman…

Part of the ‘second wave’ of Detroit artists to emerge in the early 90s – Jeff Mills and Carl Craig are among the others – Sherard Ingram, aka DJ Stingray (as well as Urban Tribe), has been a powerful force on the electro scene for more than 25 years, and given his trademark balaclava, he’s one of electronic music’s original ‘mystery men’…

In this candid interview with The Wire, from 2010, Ingram recalls how his career first got started, playing Miami Bass records at a motorcycle club – “almost no DJ would have the guts to come to that club and play those records that we played. We were forcefeeding these people techno and electro” – as well as his early work with Kenny Dixon and Drexciya.

But the interview is most notable for its beautifully poetic ending, summing up why, regardless of genre, ability or experience, those that are in the game… are IN the game.

“It’s about craftsmanship. Sure, any doorknob can get behind a computer and crank out some bleeps, blips and squelches. But it takes a craftsman to get behind a keyboard or a drum machine, and make something that people enjoy, and that’s pleasing to the intellect as well as the ear, or pleasing to the soul, or whatever that inner thing is that makes people appreciate music.

“It takes craftsmanship and hardwork, and I think if you look at some of the more elite guys and people who left a legacy, and have made an imprint, you can hear the quality in their music. It’s simply different from a run of the mill person, who goes out to the mall, or goes to their local music store and decides they want to make music.

“You know, it’s about suffering the pains of having some months where you don’t have a lot of money, and you’re suffering. You may play a club and not a lot of people turn up. But you love what you do, and that’s what separates the run of the mill guy from the guy who is a craftsman.

“It’s taking that machine and putting feeling, putting part of you into the that machine, using electronics to not just make a song, you’re trying to move people with the melody, the structure, you’re trying to peak interest. And make people sit up and pay attention to what you’ve doing…”

Well put. Check out this brilliant 40 minute Boiler Room set from the man himself, recorded in London in 2014.

Nothing says ‘solar eclipse’ like Cher on rollerskates [February 1979]…

With most of the US looking to the skies today for a ‘once in a lifetime’ total solar eclipse, plenty have been drawing comparisons between the world of today and that of February 26, 1979, when the last full eclipse made its way across the American continent…

For 909originals however, that date in February 1979 is worth remembering for a whole different reason – disco label Casablanca Records held a massive soirée at the Empire Roller Disco Skating Rink in New York, which featured an appearance by everyone’s favourite 70s diva, Cher…

You can find some [Getty Images] pictures from the event here:
http://www.gettyimages.ie/event/casablanca-records-party-february-26-1979-75346555#cher-and-guests-during-casablanca-records-party-february-26-1979-at-picture-id111250665

We’re not sure what impresses us more, the fact that Casablanca, home to Donna Summer, Parliament and many others, decided to toast the alignment of our nearest star and satellite with a roller disco… or that these pictures are arguably the most 1979 thing we’ve ever seen…

Remembering the time Kraftwerk played a field near Luton [June 1997]…

Since the launch of their Tour de France Soundtracks album in 2003, Kraftwerk have been touring fairly regularly – 909originals has been lucky enough to see them five times – and despite the lineup changing every couple of years (longtime member Florian Schneider stepped aside in 2008), it’s always a special occasion…

Back in 1997, though, Kraftwerk gigs were as rare as hen’s teeth, and thus it was quite a coup for the organisers of the Tribal Gathering festival to secure Ralf Hütter and the boys for that year’s event – in fact, as this New York Times article illustrates, it even made the news on the other side of the Atlantic.

”We developed in the end that we were the robots, and I didn’t want to be a robot any longer,” former member Wolfgang Flur recalls in the articlle. ”I could not wait always six or eight years for the next album or tour. If robots stand still, then they get rusty. They always have to work.”

As for the gig itself, it’s notable for a slower, pared-down version of Numbers to kick things off, however, by the time they get to Pocket Calculator, about 28 minutes in, it’s a full-on, rip roaring affair.

[Kudos to The Kraftwerk Database for the upload]