Before there was Creamfields, or Cream Ibiza, there was Cream, the hedonistic nightspot on Liverpool’s Wolstenholme Square, which opened on this day, 17 October, in 1992.

One of the first ‘superclubs’, Cream attracted party animals from across the UK and Ireland during its mid- to late-90s peak,; back then, Dublin was just a three-hour ferry away, almost door to door (Ryanair had still to get its ‘low-price fares’ act together).

Indeed, there were many revellers who likely shed a tear when the Nation venue which housed it was demolished in 2015… if these walls could only talk, what would they say?

909originals spoke to James Barton, the club’s co-founder earlier this year, for our Postcards from 88 series, and he described the club as the start of a ‘phase two’ of the development of the clubbing scene, the birth of acid house being ‘phase one’.

“By the time Cream opened, I could see that the club scene had fragmented into all these different genres, and that inclusive vibe of ‘playing a bit of everything’ had gone away,” he explained.

“Cream really set about trying to bring that back: different sounds every week, different DJs every week. DJs that were looking to mix it up somewhat, rather than stick to one genre.”

After all, when Cream was on fire, there were few venues like it – a writhing, gurning clubbers’ paradise. These videos, from late night ITV clubbing programme BPM, show the club in its pomp.
 

 

 

 
[Kudos to jagshrapnel for the YouTube uploads, and to Cream for all the memories!]

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