Check out this rare studio footage of CJ Bolland from 1991…

Today, 18 June, marks Belgian techno legend CJ Bolland’s 46th birthday, and with that in mind, 909originals has uncovered a video of the Carmargue producer doing his thing in the famous R&S Records studios in Ghent, back in 1991.

It was around this time that Bolland released the seminal Horsepower, on the Ravesignal III EP, and the (sadly short) video illustrates just why the Durham-born producer is regarded as one of the best in his field, as he carves a savage synth line into his E-mu Emulator III.

We’re not sure exactly what track this is, but as with most of Bolland’s early work, it can be summed up in one word… devastating.

Happy birthday CJ!

[Kudos to TheJesbel and Andromatic for the YouTube uploads]

The Ormond… 21 years gone, but not forgotten

One of Dublin’s most iconic clubbing venues, The Ormond Multimedia Centre, shut its doors for the last time 21 years ago today, 14 June 1997.

Over four years, the venue mirrored the transition of Dublin from a city with limited night-time options to one with nocturnal goings-on a plenty, as this footage from 1995 indicates.

Commenting on the last night, which saw the venue packed to the gills, one Boards.ie user summed it up perfectly: “Once I got going I couldn’t stop dancing. From what I can remember, Ken O’Flanagan and DJ Orbit were playing that night, along with a few others; there was well over a thousand people locked outside, and inside was rammed.

“The sweat was unbearable but an amazing night, and a fitting tribute to what was one of this country’s best ever clubs.”

It’s been shared a myriad of times on social media and YouTube, but this live recording of the club’s final night illustrates just what a majestically mental spot the place was.

 

In what seems somewhat remarkable today, given Ireland’s increasingly liberal culture, the venue allegedly lost its bar licence due to an unnamed police inspector objecting to the ‘venue hosting events for the gay community’.

As the Irish Independent reported in 1998, the inspector reportedly told the venue’s owners that “he wasn’t going to have anything like that going on on his patch”.

This explanation, however, was believed to be a smokescreen, with tax issues believed to be at play.

RIP The Ormond, from all who danced in thee… 🙂

[Kudos to dubgirl23 for the YouTube upload]

POSTCARDS FROM 88… Judge Jules

There’s no doubt that the summer of 1988 marked a watershed moment in the history of dance, as the house rhythms of Chicago, artistic exuberance of Ibiza, and electronic soundscapes of Detroit surged through club culture.

With this in mind, 909originals presents ‘Postcards from 88’, a new series that will see leading DJs, promoters, journalists, club owners, photographers, and of course the clubbers themselves, shed some light on just what went on during those halcyon days, 30 years ago.

This week’s ‘Postcards from 88’ comes from legal-eagle-turned-international-superstar Julius O’Riordan, better known as Judge Jules.

Do you remember what you were doing as the Summer of 1988 started?

When 1988 started I’d been doing a lot of warehouse parties; I had been a promoter and DJ for the previous three years. House records didn’t start appearing until 1986, or in any great quantity until 88, so in 1988, there was a perfect storm, of a very buoyant underground music scene and great tunes.

When or where did you first realise that ‘something different’ was happening with music?

There was a slow evolution towards something different, in that we started to see house records appearing and getting more popular, particularly in the Hacienda, where I went on a couple of occasions and saw the indie records of the time being played alongside house music. It was only when there was a sufficient volume of good releases that whole nights could be created out of house music, rather than just as individual parts of DJs’ sets.

Why do you think that people are still so interested in the origins of the dance scene, old school and everything that goes with it?

I think it’s because it went from being such a ‘them and us’ sort of scenario, with events put on by small promoters, to a multi-billion pound/dollar industry that’s truly global, and has been bought into by all the significant corporate promoters, like Live Nation. It was the seed of something that grew to be absolutely enormous culturally.

If the ‘you’ from 1988 could give the ‘you’ from 2018 a piece of music-related advice, what would it be?

It would probably relate to making records. As a producer, you learn your craft over a period of time, and I reckon I could have made some amazing records in that style, if I knew now what I knew then. What I knew then wasn’t nearly as much as the producers did at the time… especially those from Chicago.

More information on Judge Jules, including upcoming gigs, can be found at www.judgejules.net

‘Postcards from 88’ continues next week.

Rediscovering an early 90s house classic from ‘Little’ Louie Vega… [October 1991]

Today, 12 June, is ‘Little’ Louie Vega’s birthday, so with that in mind, it’s worth delving into the great man’s back catalogue and reappraising a house classic from 1991.

Before Masters at Work and Nuyorican Soul, Vega was an accomplished DJ at venues such as the Devil’s Nest, in the Bronx, as well as New York venues such as Roseland and Studio 54.

In 1991, also establishing himself as a prolific remixer, Vega teamed up with singer Marc Anthony on the album When The Night is Over, which bore one of the most Bonfire of the Vanities/American Psycho-inspired covers of all time.

The album’s standout was undoubtedly Ride on the Rhythm, which topped the Billboard Dance Charts and helped establish the ‘house sound’ that Vega would cultivate with partner in crime Kenny ‘Dope’ Gonzalez.

But what would the duo call this new alliance? Look no further than the tenth track on the album: The Masters At Work.

Happy birthday Louie, keep up the good work!

[Kudos to Revive Classics for the YouTube upload]

Happy 50th birthday Justin Robertson! Check out an awesome mix by this DJ legend from 1992… [October 1992]

From his residencies at seminal clubnights like Spice and Bugged Out!, through to his work with Lionrock and The Deadstock 33s, it’s fair to say that Justin Robertson has accomplished a lot in his musical career.

On this, the occasion of his 50th birthday (11 June), 909originals has dug deep to uncover a mix from 1992, that the then 23-year-old recorded for DJ Magazine.

Labelled the Guerilla Mastermix, and given away on a covermount tape (remember those), the mix is a tribute to the sadly-missed Guerilla Records label, and features artists such as React II Rhythm, Drum Club, Leftfield and Superreal.

Keep up the good work, Justin!

Tracklist:

React II Rhythm I Know You’ll Like It (Fabi Paras Mix)
React II Rhythm Intoxication (Rhythm Trance Mix)
React II Rhythm Intoxication (Dubfield Mix)
Supereal Body Medusa (Leftfield Mix)
Drum Club You Make Me Feel So Good (Deep N Hard Mix)
React II Rhythm Whatever You Dream (Dark Mix)
Euphoria Mercurial (Travelling At The Speed Of Light Mix)
D.O.P. Groovy Beat (Rocket Mix)

[Kudos to Mulgrew1979 for the YouTube upload, mix given away free with DJ Magazine issue No.73 (Oct 1992), Photography by Jake Davis (fb.com/hungryvisuals)]

Are Orbital set to be the ’special guest’ at the World Cup 2018 Opening Ceremony?

There are just days to go until the World Cup kicks off in Russia this Thursday, and while a number of the acts performing at the event at Moscow’s Luzhniki Stadium have already been confirmed, 909originals is holding out some hope that the ‘still to be announced’ special guest is none other than seminal dance duo Orbital.

The reason? Orbital are currently in Russia for the Bosco Fresh Festival, an event taking place today and tomorrow, with the Hartnoll brothers set to headline the event’s Main Stage on Monday night.

The opening ceremony for the World Cup is due to kick off at around 4.30pm Moscow time this Thursday, and, according to their diary, the Hartnoll brothers have no musical commitments until Friday, when they DJ at Kenwood House in the UK.

Plenty of time, in other words, to sample the best that the Russian capital has to offer, before dazzling the world with what would be one of the most spectacular opening ceremonies since Diana Ross famously missed a penalty at USA 94 (ok, a bit better than that)…

Would there be a better way than THIS to kick off a festival of football? We don’t think so.

We’re not sure who we need to call to make this happen, but President Putin, if you’re listening, stop cozying up to Donald Trump and make this happen… 🙂

[Kudos to BBC Music for the YouTube upload]

Looking for the perfect accompaniment to a sunny Friday? It’s the Graeme Park Radio Show…

The summer’s here and the drinks are served, but what’s on the stereo? The latest instalment of the Graeme Park Radio Show is here to get you ready for the weekend!

This week’s mix features First Choice, Kevin McKay, Raze, NiCe7, Semaus Haji, Byron Stingily, Dajae, The Shapeshifters, A Guy Called Gerald, Inner City, Ultra Naté and more.

Hour 1:
Hour 2: 

Turn it up… loud!

Tracklisting, 8 June 2018: [Title (Mix), Artist]

Indiscreet (Dr Packer Remix), D.C. LaRue
Dr. Love (Late Nite Tuff Guy Hypnotizin’ Groove), First Choice
Drifting (Guri 2018 Edit), Metropolitan Jazz Affair
Moobie Storm Chasers (Original Mix), Timmy P
Addiction (Reptile Dysfunction), Blantyre
Live Ur Life (Escalade Edit), Ant La Rock & Michael Moog
The Oooh Song (David Penn Remix), Kevin McKay
Run & Hide (House Mix), Kevin McKay
Break 4 Love (Archie B Remix), Raze
Real Love (Original Mix), Nice7
Dimensions (I’m Happy) (Richard Earnshaw Revibe Radio Edit), Seamus Haji presents Mekkah
God’s Child (Semedo Remix), Seamus Haji presents Big Bang Theory
Get Up (Everybody) (Mousse T Remix), Byron Stingily
All That Dancin’ (Danny Howard VIP), Danny Howard & Guz
Brighter Days (Angelo Ferreri Remix), Dajae
I Feel Love (Illyus & Barrientos Remix), MYNC & Rhythm Masters feat. Wynter Gordon
Lola’s Theme Recut (Dr Packer Remix), The Shapeshifters
Nuggetz, House Republic
Better Days (Doorly Remix), House Of Virus & Jimi Polo
Voodoo Ray, A Guy Called Gerald
Pennies From Heaven (House Of Virus & Jay C Remix), Inner City
Free (Ibitaly Remix), Ulra Naté
Soul Heaven (Pastaboys Bini & Martini Remix), The Goodfellas feat. Lisa Millet

 

THROWBACK THURSDAY: Double 99 — Ripgroove [May 1997]

Speed Garage was one of those short-lived movements that proved a crossover success on any type of dancefloor – mixing the heavy bass rhythms of mid 90s handbag house with slamming breakbeats.

Arguably the stand out track of the three-or-so-year-long genre was 1997’s Ripgroove by Double 99, aka UK garage legend Omar Adimora and Tim Liken, later to achieve fame as Tim Deluxe.

Released on Satellite Records and later on Skint, Ripgroove borrows a snippet of the classic Sugar Is Sweeter (Armand Van Helden Mix) by CJ Bolland, a dash of Kenny Dope Gonzalez and a smidgen of vocalist Tina Moore, and creates a dub house stomper that still sounds like it could be dropped into any set and send the crowd into ecstasy.

As one commenter on Discogs put it, in true Ibiza Uncovered-style, “The original mix here definitely deserves an ‘Oi Oi!!’”

We wholeheartedly agree… 🙂

[Kudos to Clubb Guide for the YouTube upload]

POSTCARDS FROM 88… Olivier Abbeloos

There’s no doubt that the summer of 1988 marked a watershed moment in the history of dance, as the house rhythms of Chicago, artistic exuberance of Ibiza, and electronic soundscapes of Detroit surged through club culture.

With this in mind, 909originals presents Postcards from 88, a new series that will see leading DJs, promoters, journalists, club owners, photographers, and of course the clubbers themselves, shed some light on just what went on during those halcyon days, 30 years ago.

This week’s Postcards from 88 comes from an artist that achieved pan-European acclaim for his work with T99 and Quadrophonia – Belgium’s finest, Olivier Abbeloos

Do you remember what you were doing as the Summer of 1988 started?

I was 19 years old and working as a seller and producer for Target Records in Aalst. Going out every evening from Thursday till Monday. Sunday was Bocaccio (nightclub) in Ghent. In short: a lot of music and parties.

When or where did you first realise that ‘something different’ was happening with music?

I discovered at the fashion shows that my father was doing that there was more to music than the usual overhyped, ‘every time the same’ stuff. I started collecting new wave, industrial, funk and soul, wave funk. At the age of 16, I started going out, together with my friend and brother in law Olivier Pieters. He played at a lot of clubs, including Boccacio, at that time, and I became influenced by a lot of music played at the big city clubs in Gent, Antwerp and Brussels.

Q. Was there a particular tune from the Summer of 1988 that stood out for you? Why?

There was so much going on in 1988. There was acid house, and in Belgium we had the New Beat scene. It’s hard to pick one, when you have Mr Fingers ‘Can You Feel It’, A Guy Called Gerald ‘Voodoo Ray’, Stakker ‘Humanoid’ happening in the same year .
Let’s go for Bam Bam ‘Where’s Your Child’ or ‘Jesus Loves The Acid’ by Ecstasy Club as an acid choice. And Zsa Zsa Laboum ‘Something Scary’ and The KLF ‘What Time Is Love (Pure Trance)’ for the New Beat scene. Why? Because of the darker edge.

Why do you think that people are still so interested in the origins of the dance scene, old school and everything that goes with it?

Inspiration. The TB 303 is getting a revival these days. The beginning of techno started then – the T909 and 808 – the layers in a track were set out. History is just repeating itself. The only difference is now you have 75% of the kick ruling in a track. In 1988 it was 30%; you had a lot more detail and elements happening.

If the ‘you’ from 1988 could give the ‘you’ from 2018 a piece of music-related advice, what would it be?

Don’t think too much. It’s the vibe that counts.

Postcards from 88 continues next week.

Is today, 5 June, the anniversary of Ferris Bueller’s ‘actual’ Day Off?

A non dance-related post today, but still one I’m sure you’ll find interesting. Plus it gives me an excuse to post Sigue Sigue Sputnik on the blog.

There’s been a lot of speculation as to the exact day that Ferris Bueller, the titular star of Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, plays hooky, but one eager sports fan has pinpointed June 5th, 1985 as the afternoon in question.

Following exhaustive analysis of baseball scores from around the 1985-86 period, (the movie was released in July 1986), Larry Granillo noticed that during their epic day-long adventure – Ferris and friends Cameron and Sloane show up at Wrigley Field, the home of the Chicago Cubs.

Based on the limited baseball coverage we see in the movie, Granillo determined that the footage must have been shot during an actual Cubs match, against the Atlanta Braves, which started at 1.25pm that day.

Things start to get a little bit complicated, timeline wise, given the often lengthy time a baseball match takes to complete.

As Granillo writes, “The eleven-inning game took 3:09 to complete, which means that the foul ball Ferris catches had to have been sometime after 4:00pm. That leaves, at the most, one hour and forty-five minutes for their trips to the museum, Sears Tower, the lake, and Sloane’s house, while squeezing in two musical numbers during the parade before racing home at 5:55pm. Seems a bit tough to squeeze all of that in for most normal people.

“But, seeing as Ferris has the magical ability to sound exactly like both a young Wayne Newton and a young John Lennon, I’m willing to believe he could make the schedule work.”

So is it possible? After all, as Ferris himself says elsewhere in the movie, “Life moves pretty fast…”